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Trims and Tapes Glossary

 

Single Fold Bias Tape


How it's Made: Fabric is cut on the bias grain (45 degree angle) into strips. Raw edges are folded under lengthwise on either side of the strip.
Width: 1/2" finished
Uses:
  • Single fold bias tape is often used to finish armholes and necklines, as an alternative to flat facings. This type of facing works well on children's apparel, since construction is fast and easy. Bias tape launders well, as an added bonus.
  • Lightweight and easy to apply, single fold bias tape is ideal for creating casings. The tape is applied to the wrong side of the garment and stitched in place, forming a channel for narrow elastic and drawstrings.
  • Add single fold bias tape to the outside of a garment as an accent or trim.
How to Apply:
  • When used as a facing, open one edge of the tape and apply to armhole or neck edge with right sides together. Stitch in a 3/8" seam. Press seam open, then turn the tape to the inside of the garment, encasing the seam allowances. Stitch close to the remaining folded edge, through all thicknesses, to permanently secure the facing.
  • When used as a casing, place the tape along the line indicated on the pattern for the casing. Stitch close to each folded edge to secure.
  • When used as trim, place on the right side of the garment as desired and pin in place. Stitch close to each folded edge to secure.

 

Double Fold Bias Tape


How it's Made: Fabric is cut on the bias grain (45 degree angle) into strips. Raw edges are folded under lengthwise on either side of the strip. The strip is then folded lengthwise, just slightly off center.
Width: 1/4" finished
Uses:
  • Binding for seam edges and hems – the double fold of the tape encases the raw edge for a clean, tailored finish.
  • Narrow double fold bias tape is a great alternative to cording or ribbon for tie ends and drawstrings.
How to Apply:
  • You will notice that double fold bias tape is folded just off-center. When using it as a binding, be sure to wrap the tape around the edge to be bound, being sure that the raw edge touched the center fold and the slightly wider half of the tape is on the wrong side of the fabric. Stitch close to the edge of the tape on the right side, sewing through all thicknesses. Having the slightly wider half of the tape on the wrong side ensures that it is caught in the stitching.
  • When using double fold bias tape in place of cord or ribbon, stitch the open long edge of the tape closed, stitching close to the edge.

 

Extra Wide Double Fold Bias Tape


How it's Made: Fabric is cut on the bias grain (45 degree angle) into strips. Raw edges are folded under lengthwise on either side of the strip. The strip is then folded lengthwise, just slightly off center.
Width: 1/2" finished
Uses:
  • Binding for seam edges and hems – the double fold of the tape encases the raw edge for a clean, tailored finish.
  • Double fold bias tape is a great alternative to cording or ribbon for wider tie ends and drawstrings.
How to Apply:
  • You will notice that double fold bias tape is folded just off-center. When using it as a binding, be sure to wrap the tape around the edge to be bound, being sure that the raw edge touched the center fold and the slightly wider half of the tape is on the wrong side of the fabric. Stitch close to the edge of the tape on the right side, sewing through all thicknesses. Having the slightly wider half of the tape on the wrong side ensures that it is caught in the stitching.
  • When using double fold bias tape in place of cord or ribbon, stitch the open long edge of the tape closed, stitching close to the edge.

 

Wide Single Fold Bias Tape


How it's Made: Fabric is cut on the bias grain (45 degree angle) into strips. Raw edges are folded under lengthwise on either side of the strip.
Width: 7/8" finished
Uses:
  • Single fold bias tape is often used to finish armholes and necklines, as an alternative to flat facings. This type of facing works well on children's apparel, since construction is fast and easy. Bias tape launders well, as an added bonus.
  • Lightweight and easy to apply, single fold bias tape is ideal for creating casings. The tape is applied to the wrong side of the garment and stitched in place, forming a channel for elastic and drawstrings.
  • Add single fold bias tape to the outside of a garment as an accent or trim.
How to Apply:
  • When used as a facing, press tape completely open; fold in half lengthwise and then press. Apply to armhole or neck edge with right sides together. Stitch in a 3/8" seam. Press seam open, then turn the tape to the inside of the garment, encasing the seam allowances. Stitch close to the remaining folded edge, through all thicknesses, to permanently secure the facing.
  • When used as a casing, place the tape along the line indicated on the pattern for the casing. Stitch close to each folded edge to secure.
  • When used as trim, place on the right side of the garment as desired and pin in place. Stitch close to each folded edge to secure.

 

Double Fold Quilt Binding


How it's Made: Fabric is cut on the bias grain (45 degree angle) into strips. Raw edges are folded under lengthwise on either side of the strip. The strip is then folded lengthwise, just slightly off center.
Width: 7/8" finished
Uses:
  • Binding for quilts, blankets and heavy fabrics – the double fold of the tape encases the raw edge for a clean finish.
  • Double fold bias tape is a great alternative to cording or ribbon for wide tie ends and drawstrings.
How to Apply:
  • You will notice that like double fold bias tape, quilt binding is folded just off-center. When using it as a binding, be sure to wrap the tape around the edge to be bound, being sure that the raw edge touched the center fold and the slightly wider half of the tape is on the wrong side of the fabric. Stitch close to the edge of the tape on the right side, sewing through all thicknesses. Having the slightly wider half of the tape on the wrong side ensures that it is caught in the stitching.
  • Miter corners to maintain a sharp angle when binding quilts and blankets. To form the miter, make a diagonal fold in both sides of the binding at the corner, tuck the folds to the inside and slip stitch the resulting opening at the corner to close.
  • When using quilt binding in place of cord or ribbon, stitch the open long edge of the tape closed, stitching close to the edge.

 

Hem Facing


How it's Made: Fabric is cut on the bias grain (45 degree angle) into strips. Raw edges are folded under lengthwise on either end of the strip.
Width: 1-7/8" finished
Uses:
  • To finish a hem, especially useful for a curved hem
  • Lightweight and easy to apply hem facing is also used for creating casings. The tape is applied to the wrong side of the garment and stitched in place, forming a channel for elastic and drawstrings.
How to Apply:
  • Press open one edge of the tape. Apply tape to hem with right sides together and stitch in a 3/8" seam. Press seam open, then turn tape to the inside, encasing the seam allowances. Slip stitch or machine stitch hem tape to inside of garment, stitching close to the remaining folded edge of the tape.
  • When used as a casing, place the tape along the line indicated on the pattern for the casing. Stitch close to each folded edge to secure.

 

Maxi Piping


How it's Made: Fabric is cut on the bias grain (45 degree angle) into strips. Strips are then wrapped around cotton cording and stitched closed, close to the cording.
Width: 1/8" wide with 3/8" lip
Uses:
  • Encased in seams as an accent.
  • Applied along the edge of a garment, such as a skirt hem, to provide a decorative finish.
How to Apply:
  • When inserting piping, place the piping on the right side of the fabric, placing it along the seam line so that the cord of the piping is on the inside (toward the garment) and the lip is on the outside (toward the seam allowance). Be sure that the edge of the lip is 1/4" away from the edge of the seam allowance. Baste in place. Pin the garment sections with right sides together; the piping will be in between the fabric layers. Using a zipper foot, stitch in a 5/8" seam, stitching as closely as possible to the cord of the piping. When the garment is right side out, only the corded part of the piping will show.
  • When applying piping to the edge of a hem, turn up hem allowance as directed and press. Place the piping along the wrong side of the garment, with the cord portion running along the folded edge. Using a zipper foot, edge-stitch the piping to the hem, stitching through all thicknesses. Trim any excess hem allowance to the width of the lip. Slip stitch the lip in place for a neat finish.

 

Blanket Binding


How it's Made: 100% polyester woven edge satin strips are folded in half. Strips are straight weave, not on the bias grain.
Width: 1-1/2" to 2" finished
Uses:
  • Binding for blankets– the fold of the satin strip encases the raw edge for a clean finish.
How to Apply:
  • Slip over raw edge of the blanket, being sure that the raw edge touches the fold. Extend 1" beyond the blanket. Stitch close to woven edge, sewing through all thicknesses. Stitch again 1/4" from first row of stitching. Fold in ends and hand tack in place.

 

Soft & Easy Hem Tape


How it's Made: 100% polyester woven edge fabric strips include sewing guidelines woven in.
Width: 1/2" finished
Uses:
  • Seam stay and reinforcement strips.
  • Hem finish – hem tape helps blend the gap between one layer of fabric and two layers (second layer is formed by folding up the hem allowance). When pressing the finished hem, this eliminates unsightly ridges on the outside.
How to Apply:
  • When using hem tape to reinforce a seam, center the tape over the seam line. Stitch the seam as directed, stitching through the tape as well. The tape will help stabilize the seam, especially on shoulder seams of knit tops.
  • When using hem tape to finish a hem, lap the wrong side of the tape 1/2" over the right side of the raw edge of the hem. Edge stitch tape to fabric. Turn up hem as directed. Hem stitch free edge to inside of the garment.

 

Iron On Hem Tape


How it's Made: 100% polyester woven edge fabric strips include two rows of adhesive on the wrong side of the tape.
Width: 1/2" finished
Uses:
  • Hem finish – hem tape helps blend the gap between one layer of fabric and two layers (second layer is formed by folding up the hem allowance). When pressing the finished hem, this eliminates unsightly ridges on the outside.
How to Apply:
  • When using hem tape to finish a hem, lap the wrong side of the tape 1/2" over the right side of the raw edge of the hem, with adhesive side down. Iron with firm pressure for 10 seconds (wool setting, with steam) to activate the adhesive and bond the tape to the fabric. Turn up hem as directed. Hem stitch free edge to inside of the garment.

 

Flexi-Lace Hem Tape


How it's Made: 100% nylon decorative lace hem finish, suitable for all fabrics.
Width: 3/4" finished
Uses:
  • Hem finish – hem tape helps blend the gap between one layer of fabric and two layers (second layer is formed by folding up the hem allowance). When pressing the finished hem, this eliminates unsightly ridges on the outside. Especially great for lightweight fabrics that drape.
  • Decorative accents.
How to Apply:
  • When using lace hem tape to finish a hem, lap the wrong side of the tape 1/4" over the right side of the raw edge of the hem. Edge stitch lace hem tape to fabric. Turn up hem as directed. Hem stitch free edge to inside of the garment.
  • Use lace as a decorative accent by edge stitching along both sides of lace hem tape as desired on the outside of the garment.

 

Flexi-Lace Hem Facing


How it's Made: 100% nylon decorative lace hem finish, suitable for all fabrics.
Width: 1-3/4" finished
Uses:
  • Hem finish – hem tape helps blend the gap between one layer of fabric and two layers (second layer is formed by folding up the hem allowance). When pressing the finished hem, this eliminates unsightly ridges on the outside. Especially great for lightweight fabrics that drape.
  • Decorative accents.
How to Apply:
  • When using lace hem tape to finish a hem, lap the wrong side of the tape 1/4" over the right side of the raw edge of the hem. Edge stitch lace hem tape to fabric. Turn up hem as directed. Hem stitch free edge to inside of the garment.
  • Use lace as a decorative accent by edge stitching along both sides of lace hem tape as desired on the outside of the garment.

 

Soutache Braid


How it's Made: rayon narrow rounded braid has a sewing ditch running up the center of the braid.
Width: 3/32" finished
Uses:
  • Accent trim and scroll motifs.
  • Tie ends, drawstrings and lacing.
  • Button loops.
How to Apply:
  • For accent trim and scroll motifs, place soutache braid as desired and pin in place. You can also use a light fabric spray adhesive to hold the braid in place as you sew. Machine stitch braid to garment, stitching through the center ditch.
  • Thread braid through casings and grommets for drawstrings or lacings. Apply as directed in pattern when using as tie ends.
  • Cut small pieces of soutache to form individual button loops. Follow pattern instructions for correct cutting and placement.

 

Middy Braid


How it' Made: rayon narrow flat braid.
Width: 1/8" finished
Uses:
  • Accent trim.
  • Tie ends, drawstrings and lacing.
  • Button loops.
How to Apply:
  • For accent trim, place soutache braid as desired and pin in place. You can also use a light fabric spray adhesive to hold the braid in place as you sew. Hand tack in place, or machine stitch to garment, stitching through the center.
  • Thread braid through casings and grommets for drawstrings or lacings. Apply as directed in pattern when using as tie ends.
  • Cut small pieces of middy braid to form individual button loops. Follow pattern instructions for correct cutting and placement.

 

Twill Tape


How it's Made: cotton or polyester is woven with a distinct diagonal rib, for exceptional strength.
Width: 1/4" – 2"
Uses:
  • Seam stay and reinforcement strips.
  • Seam finishing – use twill tape to bind seams on jackets, coats and mid to heavy weight fabrics.
  • Decorative trim.
  • Tie ends and drawstrings.
How to Apply:
  • When using twill tape to reinforce a seam, center the tape over the seam line. Stitch the seam as directed, stitching through the tape as well. The tape will help stabilize the seam, especially on shoulder seams of knit tops.
  • Wrap twill tape around the raw edge of seam allowances to encase the raw edge. Stitch close to the tape edge, being sure to catch both edges of the tape securely.
  • Twill tape is slightly flexible, making it ideal for accenting straight and slightly curved edges. Place as desired on the outside of the garment and stitch in place by machine, stitching along both edges of the twill tape.
  • Use twill tape in place of fabric or ribbon ties and drawstrings. Be sure to knot ends or use a seam sealant to prevent fraying.

 

Rick Rack


How it's Made: 100% polyester flat braid is woven into a zig zag pattern.
Width: Baby (1/4" wide) – Jumbo (approximately 1- 1/4" wide)
Uses:
  • Decorative Trim.
How to Apply:
  • Rick rack can be placed on the right side of the garment as desired, with great results. The zig zag shape is extremely flexible, so it can follow straight or curvy lines to create a wide range of shapes and motifs. Place as desired and pin, baste or use washable spray adhesive to help hold rick rack in place. Stitch up the center of the rick rack.
  • Rick rack can also be used as an insertion trim, a fun accent for armholes, necklines, pockets and hems. Place the center of the rick rack over the seam line on the right side of the fabric. Pin the garment sections with right sides together; half of the rick rack will be in between the fabric layers. Stitch in a 5/8" seam. When the garment is right side out, only half of the rick rack will show.

 

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